Love & Barbershops | 2018 TPR Gallery Personal Photography Project

11 November - 23 December 2018

Kim Sinclair • Saini-Marita Copp • Alberto Florez • Mila Logan • Jennifer Pinkerton • Michael Ye • Eva Schroeder • Julia Boyd • Rachel Mounsey

TPR Gallery is pleased to present the gallery’s final exhibition for 2018 Love & Barbershops, a group exhibition by nine photographers who, for the past year, have been working with TPR’s Sean Davey and Aishah Kenton to produce personal and individual series of works.

The nine photographers presented in the exhibition, Rachel Mounsey, Kim Sinclair, Michael Ye, Julia Boyd, Mila Logan, Eva Schroeder, Jennifer Pinkerton, Saini-Marita Copp and Alberto Florez, all answered a call out to participate in the 2018 TPR Gallery Personal Photography Project, a year-long workshop that was designed to engage photographers in a sustained personal project of their own choosing. The final result of this workshop is the exhibition you see in the gallery today.

The workshop participants met ten times throughout the year, each session included group critiques on each photographer’s work-in-progress, editing and sequencing of photographs and importantly, delicious shared pot-luck lunches. As the year passed the participants developed stronger relationships as they not only developed their own works, but actively engaged and offered feedback and genuine encouragement on the works of their fellow photographers. Twelve months after beginning on this journey, this group is now one of friends who share a common interest in the medium of photography.

The language of photography is a varied one; it records time and place, things that we can see and put a date to. But it also records so much more, things that are less able to be seen, and at times, are often better felt. The nine projects you see in Love & Barbershops (in both gallery spaces, upstairs and downstairs) use the medium in different ways; some are accompanied by words, like Jen Pinkerton’s Love Notes which explores the notion of love and what it means to different people, while others offer only limited information to assist the viewer’s contextual awareness. Mila Logan’s close engagement with a friend coming to terms with her child’s rare chromosomal disorder shows us the tender and unbreakable bond between mother and child in such an intimate and honest way.

Michael Ye’s work Year of Dog is an homage to his Uncle Li, who passed away this year. In what has admittedly been a bad year for Michael, he has grasped photography as a way of dealing with grief and using it  ‘as my way of expression, to be in tune with my emotions and as an action of making known my thoughts and feelings… And most importantly, my memory of the important people who have left us.’

Julia Boyd has stayed close to home (where some of the most compelling photographs are to be found) and turned her camera on her daughter Emma and husband Dickie. In recording intimate moments of her own family life, Julia’s work helps to reminds us that everyday moments can be extremely beautiful, and that they offer ample opportunities to make heartfelt photographs, ones that will only become more important as time goes on.

Rachel Mounsey lives in the regional Victorian town of Mallacoota; she works in the local pub and is the town’s much loved documentary photographer. Rachel is a firecracker, her enthusiasm and excitement for all things photography is unstoppable, and her unbridled energy and love for making pictures is at once evident in her photographs. With a camera constantly by her side – even when working behind the bar – Rachel is always aware of the light, an aspect of her work that is immediately apparent for its rich cinematic quality. Rachel lives and breathes photography, and her family and her town are at the heat of it all.

For this project, Kim Sinclair has delved into her extensive archive of medium format film photographs of barbershops, made between 1998 and 2000, with a 1956 Rolleiflex camera. Kim’s hand printed gelatin silver photographs (which take serious amounts of time and care to produce) reveal her long-standing love for the medium of photography. Exploring archival images of barber shops from her hometown in Toronto, Kim writes, “The modest barbershop displayed a clinical vernacular that intrigued me, it seemed a place of solitude as well as a place of business, where not much talking went on, where well-dressed-men would sit in their own barber chairs reading the news, waiting for customers… for years.” Accompanying the eight black and white gelatin silver prints are four colour archival pigment prints, scanned from medium format negative and printed with modern inkjet technique.

When we think of love, it is hard not to think of the people in our lives, present and past, who have influenced us, and who will always be part of who we are. Saini-Marita Copp, Alberto Florez and Eva Schroeder have all taken their family histories as starting points for their projects, looking at the people who share not only the same blood, but who also share the same stories. Saini takes us to Samoa, where “With each passing year, I feel an increased yearning to deeper understand my Samoan heritage and to record my family’s stories for future generations.”

Eva Schroeder uses a mix of archival portraits, including that of her grandmother, her daughter and of herself as a child, with still lives of plants and flowers, to encourage the consideration of personal family lineage. Accompanying the work is a short poem that leaves the work open-ended for personal interpretation. 

Alberto Florez’s work begins with a “stern-looking woman in a black and white photo which sat on our family bookshelf gathering dust”, a portrait of his grandmother, Maria Hernestina Marquez. Alberto’s body of work Abuelita explores his family’s Colombian roots and the strength and resilience of one woman. “Abuelita’s spirit lives on through her children, both here and in Colombia, and through the traditions of love and togetherness that connect us as a family across continents. 35 years after her death and on the other side of the world, those core values still hold true, and are part of the fabric that makes-up our extended family. Love without judgement enacts selflessness, which I believe is Abuelita's legacy.”

It has been an honour to work with the nine photographers in this year’s TPR Personal Photography Project. We hope that you enjoy the exhibition.

Sean Davey & Aishah Kenton

TPR Gallery
www.tprgallery.com.au
mail@tprgallery.com.au

Everyday Nature | Lily Platts

22 July - 9 September 2018

'I'm trying to develop my own point of view, and the way I paint. I want to make the way I paint original kind of way of painting. I think my earlier stuff was definitely influenced by a lot of local artists, which was good at the time, but I want to branch out and make it my own. I think that has definitely been something that's changed since living in Canberra. I think having a different subject matter forces you to reassess how you paint, because you have to look at it in a different way.'

See the works here.


- Lily Platts

UNKNOWN/UNTITLED

'Unknown/Untitled - Colour Photographs'
20 May - 8 July 2018

20180501_Untitled-Unknown.jpg

Belinda Pratten | Somewhere in Newtown

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
20 November - 18 December 2016
Sundays 10am-4pm & by appointment
(Saturdays and Sundays in December)

View works here

Somewhere in Newtown  exhibition installation in the Solo Exhibition Gallery.

Somewhere in Newtown exhibition installation in the Solo Exhibition Gallery.

Susan Henderson | End of Day

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
21 October - 6 November 2016
Opening Friday 21 October 6pm
Sundays 10am-4pm & by appointment

Archival pigment prints on Japanese Gampi paper, printed 2016 (various sizes available).

“There is a fascination in the way in which the camera can capture the atmosphere of a moment, not for its beauty or impact, but for the sense of being there or curiosity and memory about the moment.” 
 
Susan also enjoys images composed of reflected and refracted light and the way in which a photograph can tell a story and reinvent that which is reflected, becoming an end in itself. The viewer can find his or her own interpretation, which can indeed change over time. Susan’s composed images sometimes incorporate juxtaposed aspects or layers of fine detail.
 
Through the images in this exhibition, Susan has caught a transient moment and a feeling for place. Her most successful images resonate an emotion or inference of being there.

Susan Henderson  End of Day  exhibition installation.

Susan Henderson End of Day exhibition installation.

Meg Hewitt | Tokyo is Yours

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
30 September - 16 October 2016
Sundays 10am-4pm & by appointment

Tokyo Is Yours is inspired by Manga, Japanese printmaking and film noir. All images are sourced from reality but explore archetypes, fantasy and metaphor. I am looking for the layers between things, exploring memories, human connection, fear and escapism. Tokyo Is Yours is set in Japan post the great East Earthquake and Tsunami of 2011.

'Tokyo is Yours' exhibition installation, 30 September - 16 October 2016.

'Tokyo is Yours' exhibition installation, 30 September - 16 October 2016.

Parisa Applegarth | Women of Remote Hill Tribes in South East Asia

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
9-25 September 2016
Sundays 10am-4pm & by appointment

Parisa Applegarth, Myanmar (Waa) - 2015 Chromogenic print (open edition) Exhibition print size: 45cm x 30cm (image size) 55cm x 40cm (paper size)  (Photograph available in different sizes).

Parisa Applegarth, Myanmar (Waa) - 2015
Chromogenic print (open edition)
Exhibition print size:
45cm x 30cm (image size)
55cm x 40cm (paper size) 
(Photograph available in different sizes).

Octavio Garcia | Aztec Gods

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
14 August - 4 September 2016
Sundays 10am-4pm & by appointment

Artist Talk: Sunday 4 September 2016, 12pm.

Octavio Garcia | Aztec Gods (installation of exhibition in the Solo Exhibition Gallery).

Octavio Garcia | Aztec Gods (installation of exhibition in the Solo Exhibition Gallery).

The People of the Fifth Sun re-creates a Pantheon of Aztec Gods, using sacred images which were originally carved in stone and painted on traditional paper made from bark (Codex). By applying photographic chemistry through fine cuts made directly onto the B&W photographic paper, I create a series of unique photographs, which renews and strengthens my spiritual beliefs and cultural identity as a Mexican.

This on-off series is a further exploration into experimental photography that started with my creative desire to break away from digital photography. I started by experimenting with pinhole photography, which led me back to the darkroom environment and the traditional wet process.  

The Chemigram is an experimental photographic technique invented in 1956 by Pierre Cordier (Brussels, Belgium, 1933). I was generously introduced to Cordier’s work by Canberra based artist and post-graduate student at ANU, Matt Higgins, and to his own Chemigram research, as well as to other American artists who have created abstract work following Cordier’s principles in the present day.

The People of the Fifth Sun looks to depict the cosmic vision of the Aztecs, a civilization that was never culturally defeated.  As a result of my research, I was able to innovate a stenciling technique that allowed me to introduce a pictorial element to the Chemigram abstract domain. The mighty Aztec Gods have been re-created, and their visual attributes translated to a new experimental photographic medium that empowers them with new glory.

On Reading: Photobooks

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
24 July - 7 August 2016
Sundays 10am-4pm & by appointment

As part of the Brisbane Photobook Club’s celebrations for World Photobook Day (WPBD) last year, Doug Spowart and Victoria Cooper coordinated an exhibition at Maud Gallery in Brisbane that featured 67 Australian, New Zealand and international photographers' self-portraits, made whilst reading their favourite photobooks. The photographers were also asked to write about their favourite book, which accompanied their photo.

Due to the interest in the original concept the project has been extended and re-titled  On Reading: Photobooks. The extended phase of this project is inspired by the book On Reading, in which André Kertész brought together a large number of photographs that he had made over many years of people reading books in all kinds of places. In February this year a selection of contributions to the project were presented at Photobook New Zealand and now a special curated set will be shown at The Photography Room in Canberra from 24 July - 7 August.

Photographers included in the show are: Ying Ang, Daniel Boetker-Smith, Martin Parr, Larissa Leclair, Harvey Benge, Louis Porter, Stephen Dupont, Gael Newton, Jack Piccone, Juno Gemes, Kelly Hussey-Smith, Sam Harris, Marshall Webber, Michael Coyne, Libby Jeffries, Alison Stieven-Taylor, Garry Trinh, Matt Johnston and more.

Dawne Fahey | 1953

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
1 - 21 July 2016
Sundays 10am-4pm & by appointment

#24, chemigram on gelatin silver paper. 25x20cm. Unique print.

#24, chemigram on gelatin silver paper. 25x20cm. Unique print.

Unlike conventional black & white photographs, Dawne Fahey did not require any camera, film or data card to make these prints. When making chemigrams, their outcome is largely an unknown and a little bit of a mystery. Traditional photographic printers though generally work with certainties; we understand cause and effect, and possess the knowledge and experience to create our desired results. My motto is “reduce the variables”, and it takes a great deal of time and practice to create these works of beauty while dealing with unknown factors.

Due to this uniqueness, it can become a case of knowing when to stop. If you take the process one step too far, then you can enter the abyss and the print you have been working on for days, is gone.

When LIGHT is transmitted onto silver gelatin black & white paper, one can expect at least 50 shades of grey, some black and some white, yet on the walls before us we see anything but a black and white print. I find this a wonderful abnormality, and it gives colour to my monochrome view of black and white printing. It kind of makes me want to get out of the darkroom a little more often.

Chemistry is an essential tool for photographic printmakers, yet here, it is used in an unconventional manner. The interplay of developer and fixer transforms and contorts the image as opposed to converting the silver salts to a metallic silver, and then removing the remaining soluble silver salts to make a stable, permanent image. Each time the chemical process is incorporated, something new is created, and the image evolves before our eyes once again. But this chemical reaction is an unknown. How exciting and liberating this must feel – to just take the plunge.

Magic can be found anywhere – it is right in front of us. Light plus chemistry can equal magic. It takes a deft touch, time and experience to encapsulate it unto paper. These prints have been hand made, using no computers, no Photoshop and not even electricity if so desired. Yet just because a print is hand made does not mean it should hang on a wall, they still need to be exceptional.

These prints can never, ever be replicated. They will age, they may change, but they will always be wholly unique objects of beauty. If any of these prints cause a reaction within you, then that is the magic I am talking about. And you can buy this feeling, take it home and hang it upon a wall. That is pretty special, isn’t it?

When we live in a world of data, pixels, ones and zeros, wouldn’t it be a joy sometimes, to just look at a pretty picture, crafted by hand and created by a Light, chemistry and a little bit of magic. I think it is just wonderful…

Chris Reid | Blanco Negro

www.blanconegro.com.au

Michael Masters | Black & White Landscapes

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
27 May - 12 June 2016
Fridays 4-7pm + Sundays 10am-4pm (& by appointment)
Exhibition Opening & Artist Reception: 6pm Friday 27 May

The Photography Room is pleased to present Black & White Landscapes by Michael Masters. 

Michael Masters spent the majority of 2015 based in Washington D.C. in the USA. During this time Michael made frequent trips to photograph the natural woodlands of the Appalachian Trail in Virginia. Upon returning to Canberra, Michael has continued his work with natural environments, focusing on the bushland surrounding his hometown of Canberra.

The landscapes made in the ACT include images of critically endangered yellow box–Blakely’s red gum grassy woodlands. These woodlands are of national significance and contain some of the best-connected, most botanically diverse stands in Australia.

The prints in this exhibition are amongst the most accomplished pigment prints The Photography Room's Director Sean Davey has ever seen. For those who love traditional silver gelatin black and white photography, this is an exhibition not to be missed. Michael's landscapes embody a sensibility and awareness of space and tonal range rarely seen in modern-day inkjet prints. Michael's work is a true accomplishment in photography and in printing.

Murrumbidgee River Corridor , ACT (2014). Printed 2016. 26cm x 42cm Pure Pigment Print on Cotton Fibre Rag.

Murrumbidgee River Corridor, ACT (2014). Printed 2016.
26cm x 42cm
Pure Pigment Print on Cotton Fibre Rag.

Dörte Conroy | Undertoe

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
13-22 May 2016
Fridays 4-7pm + Sundays 10am-4pm (& by appointment)
Exhibition Opening & Artist Reception: 6pm Friday 13 May

The Photography Room is pleased to present Undertoe by Dörte Conroy. 

Walking, looking and seeing… I have a fascination with the endless variety of patterns, shapes and colours right there at my feet - infinitely diverse patterns in the urban environment.
As I wander, I observe the ground, focusing on a small segment of the bigger picture. What I capture are these graphic glimpses. 

Undertoe was made in both Hobart’s waterfront and in Sydney’s older areas. The series is divided into six sections; CutsPlumbingSeedsShadowsTextures and Waterfront.

Mark Mohell

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
1-11 May 2016
Sundays 10am-4pm & by appointment
Artist Talk: 12pm Sunday 8 May

The Photography Room is pleased to present a solo exhibition by Mark Mohell. Mark will present a selection of photographs from his recent series' Under Power (2013) and Kerbside (2015). Mark will give an informal artist talk about his work and working methods at the gallery at midday on Sunday 8 May.

Prints   from the series  Under Power  and  Kerb Side  are on display. All images are pigment prints, printed in an edition of 5 (61x86cm).

Prints from the series Under Power and Kerb Side are on display. All images are pigment prints, printed in an edition of 5 (61x86cm).

Exhibition images below (click to enlarge).

 

 

Paul Jurak | The Lake

Solo Exhibition Gallery
The Photography Room
Old Bus Depot Markets
Kingston, ACT
3-10 April 2016
Sundays 10am-4pm & by appointment

Artist Talks: Sunday 3 April, 12pm & Sunday 10 April 12pm.

Canberra Balloon Festival  (2014), chromogenic photograph (30x45cm).

Canberra Balloon Festival (2014), chromogenic photograph (30x45cm).

The Photography Room is pleased to present The Lake by Paul Jurak in the Solo Exhibition Gallery from 3-10 April. Paul Jurak, aka the Kayakcameraman, will present a selection of photographs made from the vantage point of his kayak on Lake Burley Griffin from 2012 to present. Having only come to photography in the past few years, Paul initially started paddling his kayak on the lake to help his recovery from cancer. Early morning paddle sessions on the lake were Paul's way of starting the day with his own personal space and tranquility. With an interest in exploring mindfulness and awareness, Paul would paddle for an hour each morning as a kind of meditation before the rigours of daily life took hold. 

To begin with, Paul used a very simple and low resolution digital camera to make some photos of the lake each morning. After returning home, he would upload the images to his new blog, Kayakcameraman. Paul's blog soon caught the public's attention as well as that of Canberra's local newspaper, The Canberra Times, which started to post Paul's pictures on a blog called 'Lake View'.

Since 2012, Paul's enthusiasm for photography has grown and he continues to paddle each day, with photography now a primary focus. Paul has started to work with numerous private organisations, as well as Tourism ACT, and he participates whole-heartedly in the online world, sharing his photos and communicating with his ever-growing fan base. 

Paul's pictures from Lake Burley Griffin show the mystique and beauty of Australia's capital city, revealing the man-made environment co-existing with its natural surroundings.

Paul will be in the Solo Exhibition Gallery from 12-1pm on Sunday 3 and Sunday 10 April, where he will deliver an artist talk and be available for discussion about his work.