Familiar Place by Ovidiu Gordan

I like a photographic narrative based on something metaphysical like a feeling. I find this gives me much more freedom in working and this speaks more about life and the human experience, things which I am interested in and would like to explore. I believe the genius of the photographic medium is that it can show us life and speak to us about what it means to be human.
— Ovidiu Gordan (2018)

Romanian photographer Ovidiu Gordan recently released his self-published book Familiar Place, which is comprised of photographs made over the last ten years in and around his hometown in Romania. I recently saw some of the photographs from the book and I was immediately intrigued about where they were made and what compelled Ovi to make them. Ovi was kind enough to answer some questions by email about his book, and about his working methods more broadly. A few signed copies of Familiar Place are available from TPR Gallery.

Hi Ovi, your new book 'Familiar Place' is comprised of photographs made from 2007-2017. I counted 52 images in the book, both colour and black and white. Can you talk a bit about your daily life in Romania and what you get up to while you have your camera on hand to make these pictures?

Hi Sean, thanks for the interest and for asking a few questions about the book. In Romania I live in my small a quiet hometown of Simleu Silvaniei, in a house on the local hill near the forest, so I am close to nature here which I love. Being a local, I know a lot of people and I have lots of friends here and so I have access to photograph in a more personal manner. For the images in this book I did not go out specifically to take pictures but I had my camera with me while doing activities like helping my neighbor move some furniture or going out with my family to pick mushrooms for soup.  

The title Familiar Place refers to places you know and that are local to you. You once told me Romania is a wonderful place to photograph, and that I should visit, and I hope to one day! What is it about your home country of Romania that is so appealing to you to photograph there?

I guess I feel that in my country you can still experience genuine people and places, the land has a sort of hidden beauty that is always surprising. There are many people here who have very little yet they are hard-working, industrious, creative people and it’s their creativity that fascinates me the most, it’s like the purest most sincere form of artistic expression.     

I love the people in the photographs in this book. You are obviously close and welcome and they seem to feel very comfortable with you there. Can you give us a few examples of what you were doing when you made some of the pics?

For example in the picture with the lady touching the little girl’s face, the lady is my aunt and the little girl is her granddaughter, I was at their house with wedding invitations and I had my camera with me. The moment I photographed happened while we were leaving and it was getting dark. In the picture with the lady nun I was with some of my friends in a mountain village near here where we were looking to visit a bison farm, we asked a nun for directions and then I asked for a picture, she gave me this most wonderful smile and I took one picture. While I did not know her personally I felt that she gave me a loving personal moment.  The picture with the two women from the back dressed in black, they are my mother and her sister, we were at a funeral in the courtyard of the local church.           

The implied narrative of the book seems a lot to be based on your daily life experiences. It's like we are just with you, spending time. Did you struggle to come to accept your own working method or is it something you have always favored, instead of a more themed project way of working?

I find projects that are about one specific thing, boring and very limiting, especially if it’s something physical, like a project about chairs for example. I would look at three images from a project like that and I could guess what the rest of the pictures will be; I’m also not very fond of the photojournalistic stories. I like a photographic narrative based on something metaphysical like a feeling. I find this gives me much more freedom in working and this speaks more about life and the human experience, things which I am interested in and would like to explore. I believe the genius of the photographic medium is that it can show us life and speak to us about what it means to be human. I did not struggle but at the beginning I did experiment a lot with photography until I found my way.               

What role does photography play in your life? Why is it important to you?

I express my creativity through photography and this brings me joy. Also I am quite nostalgic but not in a melancholy kind of way, I believe there are things we can learn from our past and photography helps me explore these feelings I have. It has become now very important to me, like religion to a devout person.   

You have lived in the UK; tell me about the difference between working in Romania and the UK (on your personal work).

I did not do any personal projects in the UK, but I did found out things about myself and my photography as I stopped taking pictures there for the two years I stayed in London. I just did not find my familiar place that I could relate to and so I realised my art may be dependent on environment.        

Are you also a professional photographer? If not, what do you do for work?

I have a BA in Art Photography and I did a lot of independent research, I don’t know about professional, that word is misused a lot. I guess I can say I’m a visual artist. For money I have an independent internet company providing retouching services for fashion photographers based in New York and Tokyo, usually working on editorials for magazines like Vogue and Elle. I find that this craft fits well with my image making skills and I enjoy it.    

Ovi, would you mind telling me a bit about your influences and what has shaped the way in which you work (other photographers as well as music, art etc.)?

I have a long list of artists I admire including famous photographers like William Eggleston, Saul Leiter and Alec Soth, but I also enjoy the work of lesser known photographers like Mark Steinmetz, Bertien van Manen, Boris Mikhailov, Nikolay Bakharev and many others. I especially enjoy and relate to the things they have to say about their work, these are people who truly understand photography and I consider photography a very hard thing to understand. Other artist I like are Lucian Freud, Constantin Brancuși, Modigliani and Mark Rothko. As for music, I listen to The Doors, Muddy Waters, Led Zeppelin and many others. I also enjoy the old Romanian peasant folklore music recorded in the 1930’s. Also I have to mention I watch a lot of cinema, especially European films.           

In regards to your book, did you work on the edit yourself or do you have someone you work with? Tell me about the working relationships you have with other people in making this book happen.

I showed my pictures to a few artists I respect, and was carefully watching their reactions, but mostly I worked on the book edit myself for a long time. I selected the images, edited them and made the sequencing you see in the book. A friend from Poland made the design of the cover, I had my good friends from my hometown help me with the making of the promotional video for the Indiegogo campaign, to raise money for the publishing of the book. I got sponsorship from three local companies and together with the preorders from Indiegogo I was able to independently publish my photobook. I went to Bucharest the capital city of Romania to print my book and assisted in the printing process.       

Ovi, thanks so much for the insights into your work and your photographic processes. I found the book really engaging and not at all predictable, but rather full of life and wonder. I have been through it numerous times now and I still feel like I come across new things in the pictures with each viewing. Best of luck with the distribution of the book. Congratulations again!

Thank you too! I look forward to hosting you in Romania one day! All the best, Ovi. 

Ovidiu+Gordan+Familiar+Place+photobook_05.jpg

Limited, signed copies of Familiar Place are available at TPR Gallery for $55 AUD + p&h.

Copies of the book are also available from Ovi's website here.

See all the images from Familiar Place here and watch a flip through of the book below.

Gary Ramage's images from Afghanistan used by AWM for ANZAC Day 2018

A selection of Gary Ramage's images from Afghanistan made in 2011 have been used by the Australian War Memorial for the 2018 ANZAC Day Dawn Service in Canberra.

A selection of images from the Dawn Service are available to view here on the AWM's Flicker page. There is also an article on the AWM's website here talking about Gary's experiences as a war photographer. 

 Images from Gary Ramage's series 'Afghanistan' (2011) were projected on to the Australian War Memorial as part of the 2018 ANZAC Day Dawn Service commemorations. 

Images from Gary Ramage's series 'Afghanistan' (2011) were projected on to the Australian War Memorial as part of the 2018 ANZAC Day Dawn Service commemorations. 

 Click the image above to read the AWM's article on Gary Ramage.

Click the image above to read the AWM's article on Gary Ramage.

Jon Lewis interview on ABC

ABC journalist Luke Wong has interviewed Jon Lewis about his four year series 'Perfect Strangers' which is currently on show at The Photography Room in Canberra until 4 March.

Dennis Church included in BYSTANDER - A History of Street Photography

American photographer Dennis Church has had a selection of his photographs included in BYSTANDER - A History of Street Photography, authored by Colin Westerbeck and Joel Meyerowitz. 

This book has been called by some “the bible of street photography”. Church is one of thirteen contemporary artists featured and discussed in Chapter 21 The Conversation Continues.

Dennis Church, working in New York City, as well as more suburban areas, seems to be looking at the way overlapping planes of street furnishings create spatial confusion and a kind of “visual noise” that jams things together in playful tribute to the proliferation of signage and movement happening down at the street level. And oddly, some of them remind me of the way Saul Leiter, way back in the late fifties, used a vantage point near shop windows and corners to describe the city’s chaos as it appeared back then.
— Joel Meyerowitz

Backyard Exhibition

Aishah Kenton and her friend Nell Fraser, both students at The Australian National University, put on a great backyard exhibition and potluck dinner last night, with their prints for sale for $10 each (25cm x 30cm) and $20 each (80cm x 60cm). Unframed prints hung from a clothesline, some were attached to a large gumtree, while others were put on display in a garden shed. There was even a possum who made an appearance for the show (and enjoyed the crackers). With summer just around the corner, we reckon there will definitely be some more great opportunities for backyard exhibitions like this before the year's out.

 Photographer Aishah Kenton with some of her black and white archival pigment prints, which were on display and sale for $10 each. 

Photographer Aishah Kenton with some of her black and white archival pigment prints, which were on display and sale for $10 each. 

Sean Davey's 'Lesson' at Belconnen Arts Centre

Exhibition installation of 'Lesson' at Belconnen Arts Centre from 23 September until 15 October 2017. 

In 2015 photographer Sean Davey spent six weeks at Charnwood-Dunlop School as part of the ArtsACT Artists-in-Schools (now defunct) program, funded by the Australia Council.

Sean spent time with all classes at the school, from Kindergarten to Year Six, and ESL (English as a Second Language) classes, teaching digital photography as well as setting up a working darkroom in which he introduced students to analogue black and white photography.

Sean was free to photograph in and around the school, producing his own body of work as well as collecting all the photographs made by the students.

This exhibition features a selection of images made by the students and by Sean, as well as featuring three books of photographs made by the artist together with the students.

 Installation of 'Lesson' at Belconnen Arts Centre. Exhibition 22 Sep-15 October 2017.

Installation of 'Lesson' at Belconnen Arts Centre. Exhibition 22 Sep-15 October 2017.

Aishah Kenton published in Art Monthly

Aishah Kenton has the cover of this month's Art Monthly Australasia magazine, as well as a spread of images inside. This special 300th edition of Art monthly was accompanied by an exhibition of past magazine covers, shown at the School of Art, Australian National University in Canberra.

Celebrating the 300th issue of the magazine, the current issue focuses on the history of the magazine, with some great stories about the magazine's first editor Peter Townsend. A selection of Chinese prints collected by Peter is currently on show at the National Gallery of Australia to celebrate the 300th issue of Art Monthly as well. 

NEXT GENERATION: Solomon Islands After RAMSI

'NEXT GENERATION: Solomon Islands After RAMSI' by Sean Davey is currently on at Huw Davies Gallery in Canberra from 17 August - 10 September 2017.

'Lines of Site: Finding the Sublime in Canberra' at M16

Mark Mohell is exhibiting new prints and screen-based works at M16 Gallery in the Canberra suburb of Griffith (one time someone actually WENT to Griffith NSW instead of Canberra so we have to make it clear that Griffith is a suburb in Canberra). The exhibition opened last Thursday evening and is curated by Grace Blakeley-Carroll. The artists in the exhibition include Mark Mohell, Jacqueline Bradley, Cathy Franzi, Kirstie Rea, Annika Harding, Caren Florance and Melinda Smith. The exhibition is accompanied by an exquisite catalogue with loose leaf pages, one on each artist.

With only 100 copies printed, get your hands on one quick smart.

'Lines of Site: Finding the Sublime in Canberra' at M16 until 3 September.

 Lines of Site exhibition catalogue

Lines of Site exhibition catalogue

Aishah Kenton's 'Ellie' selected as a finalist in the 2017 Maggie Diaz Prize for women photographers

  Ellie  110cm x 150cm Pigment print

Ellie
110cm x 150cm
Pigment print

'Ellie' by Aishah Kenton has been selected as a finalist in the 2017 Maggie Diaz Prize for women photographers. The exhibition of finalists will be on show at Bright Space Gallery in Melbourne from 1-17 September. The $5000 cash prize aims to attract a wide range of photographers working only with available light. In 2017 the gallery received 318 entries, with 51 finalists selected for exhibition.

http://www.maggiediazprize.com/


This is the first competition Aishah has ever entered, so quite a coup for this young, up and coming photographer, who is currently in her second year studying Photomedia at the School of Art at the Australian National University in Canberra.

This photograph is part of Aishah's series Inside/Outside, which is currently on show in the Solo Gallery at The Photography Room until 24 September. This is Aishah's first solo exhibition.

 Aishah Kenton photographing with her 5x4 camera in Canberra, ACT (2017).

Aishah Kenton photographing with her 5x4 camera in Canberra, ACT (2017).

My practice is set firmly in the tradition of personal documentary photography. The subjects of my photographs include my family, friends, as well as strangers who I see (and sometimes meet) in public places.

I primarily work with black and white 35mm and medium format film. Working with analogue allows me to explore the inherent nature of film and its granular structure at the same time I explore my photographic subjects. This series of photographs was made earlier this year for my medium format film photography class at The School of Art at the ANU. I am currently in my second year of a Ba of Visual Arts in Photomedia.
 
The people in these photographs are close to me and they collaborated with me to produce this series of photographs Inside/Outside, where I photographed each person from inside their home looking out and then from outside their home looking in. I’m interested in spaces where intimacy in photographs can be found, and I am currently exploring everyday, personal situations that we are all familiar with, as locations in which to make my photographs.

- Aishah Kenton

Review by Paul Costigan in The Riot ACT

Paul Costigan has compiled a review of current photography exhibitions in Canberra, including a positive take on our three shows by Rohan Thomson, Scot Newman and Gary Ramage.

The Makers are caught at work on their craft as well as in a portrait shot. His photographs are wonderful and this exhibition has the benefit of promoting local artists and craftspeople. Another must see exhibition from The Photography Room.
 Photos of Rohan Thomson's 'The Makers' by Paul Costigan.

Photos of Rohan Thomson's 'The Makers' by Paul Costigan.

Gary Ramage's exhibition 'Afghanistan' purchased by the Australian War Memorial

Gary Ramage's exhibition 'Afghanistan' has been purchased in its entirety by the Australian War Memorial for the institution's permanent collection. Upon news of the purchase, Gary decided to donate his Hasselblad 500CM camera, which he used to make the photographs in 2011, to the War Memorial to accompany the prints. Gary also donated one print from the series as a sign of gratitude for the large acquisition and to Brendan Nelson (Director of the AWM) for his contribution to the opening of the show and for writing the exhibition foreword.

 Gary Ramage (l) with Dr Brendan Nelson, Director of the Australian War Memorial. Gary is pictured with his Hasselblad 500CM camera, which he donated to the institution after the acquisition of his entire suite of images from his exhibition 'Afghanistan'. Photo by Steve Burton/AWM

Gary Ramage (l) with Dr Brendan Nelson, Director of the Australian War Memorial. Gary is pictured with his Hasselblad 500CM camera, which he donated to the institution after the acquisition of his entire suite of images from his exhibition 'Afghanistan'. Photo by Steve Burton/AWM

Emilio Cresciani at Huw Davies Gallery (PhotoAccess)

TPR photographer Emilio Cresciani is currently showing his series Face2Face at Huw Davies Gallery, PhotoAccess in Canberra. Emilio recently spoke with Canberra Times journalist Karen Hardy about his show, which continues until 23 April.

'Intimate Activism Honours Artists at Work' by Shane Breynard published in the Visual Arts Hub

Shane Breynard, Director of Canberra Museum and Galleries, knows a thing or two about Canberra artists, and the art scene in the nation's capital. Shane was kind enough to contribute the exhibition essay to Rohan Thomson's catalogue for his current exhibition The Makers, which has been published today on the Visual Arts Hub website.

Rohan's exhibition continues until 7 May (extended from the original 30 April end date).

Click here (or the image below) to read Shane's essay.

'The Makers' in The Canberra Times

Rohan Thomson's exhibition 'The Makers' was featured in a story in The Canberra Times on Friday 24 March by Jil Hogan.

 Pages 12-13 of The Canberra Times, Friday 24 March 2017.

Pages 12-13 of The Canberra Times, Friday 24 March 2017.

Exhibition Review in The Riot Act

Paul Costigan has written a glowing review of the current exhibitions at The Photography Room. Paul must have accidently missed the downstairs gallery on his visit, as we're sure he would have been equally impressed by Dimitri Mellos's colour photographs from New York. The current exhibitions by Sean Davey, Spiro Miralis and Dimitri Mellos continue until 12 March.